NELLIS AGGRESSORS BRING ‘FIGHT’ TO LUKE

The 64th Aggressor Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, came to Luke Air Force Base last week for eight days of dissimilar air combat training to aid students from the 308th and 309th fighter squadrons with flight training and academics. Their expertise and specialized skills in replicating enemy aircraft tactics provided the students with in depth knowledge and analysis on adversary systems and tactics. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Timothy Boyer)

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. — You want results? Then train like it.

The 64th Aggressor Squadron from Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, came to Luke Air Force Base Dec. 7 through 16, 2014, to provide their expertise and specialized skills to aid students from the 308th and 309th fighter squadrons with flight training and academics.

“The aggressors are dedicated to replicating enemy aircraft tactics,” said Maj. Jalen Whitener, 308th Fighter Squadron standardization evaluation shop chief. “Bringing them here provides the students with in depth knowledge and analysis on adversary systems and tactics.”

The 64th AS launched from Luke for eight flying days. During that time, the students from the 308th and 309th were thrown in with the aggressors for two types of training: defensive perch and tap-the-cap.

“During defensive perch, an aggressor pilot lines up behind a student pilot to act as an adversary, during which time the pilot acts to identify this realistic combat environment,” said Maj. Marcus Landrum, 309th FS wing weapons and tactics. “Tap-the-cap is executed as an unexpected radar spike pick-up exercise, an indication that
the student pilot is being targeted.”

F-16s from the 64th AS have a different paint scheme than the 56th FW’s F-16s, helping student pilots to identify them.

The realistic training doesn’t stop with flight training. It also goes into the classroom. The 64th AS pilots taught specific and broad enemy tactics.

“Not only did the exercise bring support and air tactics, the students also trained in academics twice a day,” Whitener said. “The aggressors’ knowledge base is a huge opportunity for the school and Luke’s pilots to see what to bring into combat to be successful.”

Additional photos:

Jets from the 64th AGRS have a paint color scheme different from that of Luke’s jets. The 64th AGRS also flies a foreign flag to make the experience more authentic. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Pedro Mota)

The 64th Aggressor Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, came to Luke Air Force Base last week for eight days of dissimilar air combat training to aid students from the 308th and 309th fighter squadrons with flight training and academics. Their expertise and specialized skills in replicating enemy aircraft tactics provided the students with in depth knowledge and analysis on adversary systems and tactics. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Timothy Boyer)

The 64th AGRS F-16 Fighting Falcon and a 308th FS F-16 prepare for take-off during the simulated adversary flight training exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Pedro Mota)

Lt. Col. Kevin Gordon, 64th AGRS commander, prepares for launch in aggressors training at Luke. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Pedro Mota)

 

Report courtesy of Airman Pedro Mota , 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

 

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